Blog Posts and Updates

PACC Has Resumed Some Assisted TNR!

Pima Animal Care Center has resumed some assisted Trap Neuter Return services. Eligible zip codes for drop off of humane traps AND transportation assistance are 86705, 85706, 85711, 85713, 85716, 85746. Call 520-724-5983 or email Community Cats@pima.gov. *Virgin trap sites (no trapping has been done in area before) and colonies over 5 cats may be given preference.

Straw for Outdoor Cat Shelters & Bedding, Trap Covers Available Free

We have free bedding and trap covers available for TNR if you need them.  Please email us if interested at tucsonferal@gmail.com

We still have straw available for outdoor cat shelters, make sure you are checking yours regularly at the beginning of Winter and during to make sure the straw and other insulation materials aren’t full of pee or debris.  If intersted in more, email us at tucsonferal@gmail.com

 

Santa Cruz Vet Clinic Update

There should be no problems getting the majority of medical issues for community cats funded when they are taken to Santa Cruz Vet Clinic for care.  Funding is absolutely in place without the public paying for community cats to get care (for most issues).  If you encounter problems please call us.

Important reminder that Santa Cruz Vet Clinic will be closed : May be an image of drink and text that says 'WE WILL BE UNABLE TO ACCEPT FERAL CATS ON THE FOLLOWING DATES: FRIDAY, MARCH 5TH FRIDAY, MARCH 19TH MONDAY, MARCH 22ND THURSDAY, MARCH 25TH THANK YOU FOR YOUR UNDERSTANDING AND SUPPORT!'

 

Max Needs Help, Soon

Max has such severe stomatitis that he requires daily steroid injections to keep inflammation down enough so that he continues to eat. We NEED to get his 2nd surgery scheduled so that his remaining teeth can be taken out, he can start to heal and eat on his own without so much medical management. DISCLAIMER: Do NOT try this!!!. Even with extensive experience with feral cats this can be dangerous. Administering an injection from in front of a frightened cat is not ideal but since he is in the kennel, in this position, I had no choice, but I know THIS cat and what his reactions will be. His nails were trimmed last time he was sedated and he’s hitting me, not trying to claw me, telling me clearly that he does not want to be touched. Unfortunately, for feral cats that need medical attention, getting handled by people when they are sick is necessary so we have to balance interventions with stress management. This cat is not in a shelter so already we have increased his chance of survival by providing a foster based, quiet environment for him to get treatment in and then recover.

We’re just under $200 short of the estimate for his 2nd stomatitis surgery. Won’t you please consider a small donation so we can schedule surgery and get this guy on the road to recovery? Paypal here www.paypal.me/AlecsS (if you don’t use this link, paypal takes out money because they think we are selling you something) or msg us to send a check or use Zelle, Venmo. Every dollar counts💕💕💕

You can read more about stomatitis here: https://resources.bestfriends.org/article/stomatitis-cats-feline-dental-disease

#stomatitis #stomatitiscats
#stomatitiscat #communitycat #feralcat #catvocate #catadvocate #feralcatchampion #feralfriends
#eartipped #feralfoster

HELP us give a life saving Valentine’s Day present to Max 💕💕

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Max needs the second half of his stomatitis surgery to remove his remaining teeth. As you can see from this photo taken during his first surgery, the poor guy’s tissues are extremely inflamed and infected, which makes eating super painful.  Currently, he is being managed on medication to keep him eating but this uncomfortable situation will not resolve without all of the teeth being removed because this  is an immune response to the bacteria that grow on the teeth, hence all teeth need to come out.

Max and Baldur are both in their mid teens and will have more quality years ahead of them once their medical issues are under control but we really need your help. We have run out of all medical funds and are actually still about $100 in debt for meds, labs and cremations from the last few months of helping community cats.

This next surgery alone, without meds will be approx $600. Please consider a donation in any amount. (We keep a spreadsheet with donations and expenses with receipts which we are happy to share with anyone that asks.) You can make a donation using any of the following:  click here for  Paypal Donation Link  OR send a check to “Tucson Feral c/o Alecs S” PO Box 64544, Tucson, AZ  85728 OR we also have Zelle and Venmo if you email us at tucsonferal@gmail.com. Every dollar counts for these guys 💛💛

**Quick backround on Max, his lifelong colony mate was recently euthanized due to end stage kidney failure.  We included the baby cam photo as an update to show that he seems to have made friends or is at least taking comfort in, one of his colony mates (who is sick with something else) being with him. (They hide when a human goes in their room so we snuck this photo with the babycam. 

Don’t Just Focus On Kittens

Curiously, it seems many are only interested in trapping kittens and not the adults that mated and then gave birth to them. Please understand kittens don’t appear from “the stork”. We see this issue of ignorning tom cats and waiting far too long to be interested in trapping moms with regular folks, shelters, rescues, and vet clinics alike. Adult cats, yes including that tom that only visits once every three days, are the reason kittens appear. In addition to preventing new kittens let’s have some compassion for those adult cats. Their lives are SO much better after they have been spayed/neutered and vaccinated, their risk for developing certain diseases, cancers, and conditions are either eliminated or greatly reduced as a result.

Examples:🐈🐈🐈🐈
-Hormonal driven territorial fighting decreases and is eliminated in many cases of neutered males, meaning far fewer injuries from fighting, less to no transmission of FIV from bite wounds through fighting, less likelihood of being hit by a car from roaming for a mate.
-Pyometra, a potentially life threatening infection of the uterus is eliminated when female cats are spayed.
-Mammary masses are far less likely when female cats are spayed.
-Less stress from reproducing and fighting means fewer upper respiratory infections that cause blindness and eye rupture as well and the inability to eat and groom which can lead to a decine in overall health.

These are GOOD things to eliminate and lower the chances of cats experiencing.

PLEASE, don’t give up on trapping after one or two days. Talk to us and then LISTEN to our advice, we KNOW how to trap these cats. We want to help you. TNR works. 💛💛💛💛